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Landform Unit Plan for Science and Language Arts

Here is a unit on landforms that has both Language Arts and Science ELRs

Integrated Language Arts Unit Plan & Science: Landforms for a Third Grade Class

 

ETC 542 & 546

 

Language Arts Methods

 

Masters in Teaching Program

 

City University, Everett

 

August 8, 2007 

 

Sequence

Description

1.  Goals, Objectives and EALRs/GLEs

Essential / Driving Question: What is a continent, island, peninsula, mountain, volcano, hill, prairie, desert, and forest?

 

Goal: The students will understand what a continent, island, peninsula, mountain, volcano, hill, prairies, deserts, and forest are. 

 

Writing:

  EALR 2. The student writes in a variety of forms for different   

  audiences and purposes.

Component 2.3 Writes in a variety of forms/genres.

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.

EALR 3. The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1 Develops ideas and organizes writing.

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

Component 3.2 Uses appropriate style.

3.2.2 Uses language appropriate for a specific audience and purpose.

Component 3.3 Knows and applies writing conventions appropriate for the grade level.

3.3.1 Uses legible handwriting.

3.3.2 Spells words appropriate for the grade level accurately.

3.3.3 Applies capitalization rules.

3.3.4 Applies punctuation rules.

3.3.5 Applies usage rules.

3.3.6 Uses complete sentences in writing.

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify landmasses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes.

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

Health and Fitness:

EALR 4 – The student effectively analyzes health and safety information to develop health and fitness plans based on life goals.

Component 4.1: Analyze health and safety information.

4.1.1 Identify how fitness and healthy living are important for life goals.

          Use safety principles when performing age appropriate activities. 

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.2: Understands and apply concepts and procedures from measurement.

1.2.4: Apply a procedure to measure length, perimeter, time, money, value, weight/mass, capacity, and temperature.

1.2.6: Understand and apply strategies to obtain reasonable estimates of length, perimeter, time, money, weight/mass, capacity and temperature measurements. 

 

Behavioral objective:

1.       The third grade students will identify what a continent is.

2.       The third grade students will recognize that there are seven continents on Earth, to be used in a later unit. 

3.       The third grade students will play a game to comprehend what a continent is.

4.       The third grade students will draw a picture of a continent and tell what makes it a continent. 

5.       The third grade students will show understanding of what a continent is.

6.       The third grade students will show understanding of what an island is.

7.       The third grade students will show understanding of what a peninsula is.   

8.       The third grade students will identify what a mountain, volcano, and hill are. 

9.       The third grade students will in a group create a model of either a mountain, volcano, or a hill.

10.   The third grade students will compare the similarities of their models.

11.   The third grade students will draw a picture of a mountain, volcano, and a hill on their own and identify the different parts.    

12.   The third grade students will identify what prairies, deserts, and forests are.

13.   The third grade students will listen to books on prairies, deserts, and forests paying close attention to the landscapes.

14.   The third grade students will look at pictures of prairies, deserts, and forests and find similarities and differences between them. 

15.   The third grade students will create a model of each habitat.

16.   The students will read a book, that takes place in either a prairie, desert, or forest, to connect to people that live in different habitats. 

17.   The students will complete a project in their group to share with the rest of the class what their book was about and what they learned about the habitat that their story took place in.  

2.  Rationale

Students need to understand the components of the world around us as a stepping stone to understanding other latter units that deal with landforms.    

3.  Content Outline

Lesson 1: Continents: The students will be learning what continents are through discussion and through playing a game that asks questions that review what they already know about bodies of water and about continents.  They will draw a picture of a continent and tell what makes it a continent.   

 

Lesson 2: Islands and Peninsula: The students will be learning what islands and peninsulas are through an outdoor game in which they pretend to be land and move around to demonstrate continents, islands, and peninsulas.  The students will write about their desks being more like an island because they are small groups instead of one massive group of desks. 

 

Lesson 3: Mountains, Volcanoes, and Hills: The students will make models of either a mountain, volcano, or hill using clay.  Then the students will discuss the differences between them.  Then the students will draw a picture of each and point out the differences.   

 

Lesson 4: Prairies, Deserts, and Forests:  The students will be listening to stories that take place in these different areas and then discussing the differences.  They will then each make a model of a prairie, desert, and forest.

 

Lesson 5: Prairies, Deserts, and Forests Reading Groups:  The students will be choosing books that are appropriate for their reading level that have setting in either a prairie, desert, or forest.   

 

Culminating Activity: Sell Me Your Planet:  This assessment has the student make their own planet with the different landforms that we have been discussing and explaining them to sell their planet to the teacher.  The will be making a flyer with a picture of their planet and a description area to sell it to the teacher.     

4.  Sequential List of Lesson Objectives

Lesson 1: In this lesson the students will learn what a continent is. 

 

Lesson 2: In this lesson the students will learn what an island is and what a peninsula is.

 

Lesson 3: In this lesson the students will learn the differences between mountains, volcanoes, and hills. 

 

Lesson 4: In this lesson the students will learn what prairies, deserts, and forests are.

 

Lesson 5: In this lesson the students will choose a book that takes place in a prairie, desert, and forest.  Reading of these books will help the students to understand what a prairie, desert, or forest is. 

 

Culminating Activity:  This activity will insure that the students have learned what the continents, islands, peninsulas, mountains, volcanoes, hills, prairies, deserts, and forests are. 

5.  Pre-Assessment Plan

This unit will come after a unit on bodies of water and the teacher will have an idea of how much the students know because of comments that have been made throughout that unit.  To check every students understanding the teacher will give the students a blank map of the world and ask them to point out one continent, one island, and one peninsula. 

 

Map of the World

 

Name ___________________________________________________________

 

 

Here is a map of the world.  If you see a continent, island and/or peninsula please label them. 

http://encyclozine.com/Reference/Maps/World/BlankMap-World.png

 

6.  Four Sequential Instructional Plans

 

 

Lesson 1

 

Continent

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential / Driving Question: What is a continent?

 

Writing:

  EALR 2. The student writes in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes.

Component 2.3 Writes in a variety of forms/genres.

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.

EALR 3. The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1 Develops ideas and organizes writing.

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

Component 3.2 Uses appropriate style.

3.2.2 Uses language appropriate for a specific audience and purpose.

Component 3.3 Knows and applies writing conventions appropriate for the grade level.

3.3.1 Uses legible handwriting.

3.3.2 Spells words appropriate for the grade level accurately.

3.3.3 Applies capitalization rules.

3.3.4 Applies punctuation rules.

3.3.5 Applies usage rules.

3.3.6 Uses complete sentences in writing.

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify landmasses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will identify what a continent is.

2.        The third grade students will recognize that there are seven continents on Earth, to be used in a later unit. 

3.        The third grade students will play a game to comprehend what a continent is.

4.        The third grade students will draw a picture of a continent and tell what makes it a continent.

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

 

 

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   There is no use of technology for this lesson.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will ask the students to remember back to what the class has learned about different types of water.  Then the teacher will ask them: “What is an ocean?  What is a lake?  What is a river?  How about a sea?”  Then the teacher will tell the students that: “Today we are not going to look at bodies of water are called anymore but instead at what landforms are called.”  Then the teacher will have the students open up their Risk game boards; there will be one for each table.    

RATIONALE

Understanding what continents are is a building block to understanding other bodies of land.

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Inquiry Method

 

Small Group:

     Play a game

 

Individual:

     Draw a picture

    

 

 

 

 

 

The students will be using the inquiry method throughout the lesson to discuss what they already know and what they are learning about continents.

 

In small table groups the students will play a game to better understand what continents are (see attached instructions). 

 

Individually the students will be asked to draw a picture of one of the continents and be asked to write on the back of the sheet, what makes it a continent. 

 

 

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Discussing what they had learned from prior classes about bodies of water.
  2. Discussing what a continent is.   
  3. Playing a game (instructions to hand out attached)
  4. Drawing a picture of one of the continents and writing down what makes it a continent.
  5. For students that finish this early they will choose from reading silently or drawing another picture of one of the continents.    

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will be asked to think of what they know about islands for the next day’s lesson. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will regularly assess for understanding by asking questions.  The teacher will assess for individual understanding by collecting the students drawings of a continent and short paragraph that tells what makes it a continent.          

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day they student’s will be discussing what islands are and what peninsulas are.

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

 Cotinent Game:

 

Today we are going to play the continent game.  Some of you may have played a game with this game board before but today we are going to use if for a new game.  The object of this game is to correctly answer the questions and be the first one in your group to place your game pieces on one of the continents. 

 

Materials you should have in front of you:

1 game board

4 different color groups (brown, red, blue, and orange).  Each color group should have 10 pieces

Stack of game trivia cards

One die

 

Set up:

The way that you pick your color is, roll the dice.  The person with the largest number picks first, the second largest picks second and so on. The colors go with the colors on the board (ex: orange is North America).  There are the least amount of spaces on South America (red) with only 4 areas, because of this have the brown player and blue player put 2 of their game pieces on an area.  Have the orange player place 6 pieces on their area.  This will make it so that every person has to get 4 correct answers to win.

 

How to play:

The red player goes first, and the person to their left reads the top card.  The answer will be on the cards also (so don’t let them see).  If they get the answer correct then they get to put a game piece on their continent.  If they miss the answer then they do not get to put a game piece down.  Either way the play moves to the left.  The person to their left reads the question for them.  This continues until someone has game pieces on their continent, this person is the winner. 

 

If there is time then play the game again!

 

 Game questions:

 

Q: What is a large continuous land mass called?

A: A continent

 

Q: What is a great expansive body of salt water?

A: An ocean

 

Q: How many continents are there on Earth?

A: 7 (don’t forget about Antarctica in the very south of the world)

 

Q: What is a large inland body of fresh water or salt water?

A: A lake 

 

Q: What is a large area of a sea or ocean partially enclosed by land?

A: A gulf

 

Q: How many oceans are there on Earth?  

A: 5

 

Q: What is a large natural stream of water emptying into an ocean, lake, or other body of water?

A: A river

 

Q:  Something that is uninterrupted and attached together is?

A: Continuous

 

Q:  What is the smallest continent?

A: Australia

 

Q: 3 countries make up North America they are, Mexico, The United States, and which other country?

A: Canada

 

Q: True or False: Africa is South of Europe?

A: T

 

Q: What continent would you find Giraffes?

A: Africa

 

Q: What is a long passage of water connecting two larger bodies?

A: A sound

 

Q: What continent do we live on?

A: North America

 

Q: What is a sheltered part of a body of water deep enough to provide anchorage for ships?

A: Harbor

 

Q: Fill in the blank.  A continent is a large ___(blank)_______ land mass.

A:  Continuous

 

Q: What is the solid ground on Earth called?

A: Land

 

Q: Europe is east or west of Asia?

A: West

 

Q: What is a continent?

A: A large continuous land mass

 

Q: What continent would you find kangaroos on?

A: Australia

 Lesson 2

 

Islands and Peninsulas

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential/Driving Question: What is the difference between continents, islands, and peninsulas?

 

Writing:

  EALR 2. The student writes in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes.

Component 2.3 Writes in a variety of forms/genres.

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.

EALR 3. The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1 Develops ideas and organizes writing.

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

Component 3.2 Uses appropriate style.

3.2.2 Uses language appropriate for a specific audience and purpose.

Component 3.3 Knows and applies writing conventions appropriate for the grade level.

3.3.1 Uses legible handwriting.

3.3.2 Spells words appropriate for the grade level accurately.

3.3.3 Applies capitalization rules.

3.3.4 Applies punctuation rules.

3.3.5 Applies usage rules.

3.3.6 Uses complete sentences in writing.

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3,4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes.

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation

 

Health and Fitness:

EALR 4 – The student effectively analyzes health and safety information to develop health and fitness plans based on life goals.

Component 4.1: Analyze health and safety information.

4.1.1 Identify how fitness and healthy living are important for life goals.

          Use safety principles when performing age appropriate activities. 

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will show understanding of what a continent is.

2.        The third grade students will show understanding of what an island is.

3.        The third grade students will show understanding of what a peninsula is.   

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will have the students go outside.  Once outside the teacher will ask the students to: “close your eyes and imagine that you have been out in the ocean for weeks on a small raft because the boat you were on broke down.  They come across some land.  Is it a continent?  Is it an island?  Is it a peninsula?  What is a continent?  What is an island?  What is a peninsula?”  Then the teacher will have the student open their eyes.   

RATIONALE

Students need to understand what islands and peninsulas are to understand the landforms on Earth.  

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Inquiry Method

 

     Movement

 

Individual:

     Writing

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will use the inquiry method throughout the lesson to allow the students to discover their own answers. 

The students will move around as a large group to demonstrate being a continent, island, or a peninsula. 

 

The students will individually write a statement on if they believe that their desks would be considered continents, islands, or peninsulas if the floor was water.  The students will also explain why they answered the way they did. 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

1.        Discussing with classmates what a continent is, an island is, and a peninsula is.

2.        Pretending that grass outside is water and by coming close together and pretending that they are land to demon straight what a continent is.  

3.        Breaking into small groups to demonstrate what an island is. 

4.        Forming back into a continent.

5.        Having one or two groups become “islands” while the rest of the class stays as a “continent.”

6.        Forming a group that is connected to the continent but that sticks out and has “water” on 3 sides of the “peninsula”  

7.        Looking at a map of Washington State and the United States and discussing examples of islands, and peninsulas.

8.        Writing what they believe their desks are grouped as, a continent, an island, or a peninsula and why the believe this.

9.        For students that complete this task early can write a journal entry about a trip they have been to that was on an island or a peninsula or they can make up their own fiction tale of how they were stranded on an island.     

   MONITORING

To monitor the class the teacher will tell the students what land mass they are supposed to be and see if they students physically move where they are supposed to.  The teacher will also listen to the answers that the students are giving her, and she will make sure that she gives time for all students to think about the questions.     

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will decide if their desks are more like continents, islands, or peninsulas in the room and write down why they think this. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will collect their answer to the desk question.  The teacher will also assess the students’ movement as they move throughout the exercise to check for comprehension.        

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day they student’s will be discussing more land masses and they will be asked to remember what characteristics make up the continents, islands, and peninsulas.   

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

 Lesson 3

 

Mountains, Volcanoes, and Hills

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential / Driving Question: What are the similarities and differences between mountains, volcanoes, and hills?

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction.

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.2: Understands and apply concepts and procedures from measurement.

1.2.4: Apply a procedure to measure length, perimeter, time, money, value, weight/mass, capacity, and temperature.

1.2.6: Understand and apply strategies to obtain reasonable estimates of length, perimeter, time, money, weight/mass, capacity and temperature measurements. 

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will identify what a mountain, volcano, and hill are. 

2.        The third grade students will in a group create a model of either a mountain, volcano, or a hill.

3.        The third grade students will compare the similarities of their models.

4.        The third grade students will draw a picture of a mountain, volcano, and a hill on their own and identify the different parts.    

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   There is no use of technology for this lesson.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will have the students remember back to the lesson before on islands and peninsulas.  Then the teacher will ask them: “if you remember that at the beginning of that lesson that we were stranded on a raft and they came to land.  Well this land was a peninsula.  Who can tell me what a peninsula is?”  Then the teacher will say: “Does the peninsula have mountains on it, what about a hill, what about a volcano?”  What are the similarities between these three landforms?  What are some differences?       

RATIONALE

Mountains, Hills, and Volcanoes are important landforms that we find on the Earth, and the students need to understand what the differences are between them.

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Inquiry Method

 

Small Group:

     Build a model

 

Individual:

     Draw a picture

    

 

 

 

 

 

The students will be using the inquiry method throughout the lesson to discuss what they already know and what they are learning about mountains, volcanoes, and hills.

 

In table groups the students will be given directions to build either a mountain, volcano, or hill out of clay.  They will have to make observations about their model to tell the class. 

 

Individually the students will be asked to draw a picture of a mountain, volcano, and hill and identify the differences.  

 

 

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

1.        Discussing what they had learned from prior classes about continents, islands, and peninsulas.

2.        Discussing what a mountains, hills, and volcanoes are.   

3.        Make a model of a mountain, hill, or volcano.

4.        Make observations about their model.

5.        Share their model with the class.

6.        Discuss with the class the differences and similarities between the different models.

7.        Drawing a picture of a mountain, volcano, and hill and identify the differences between them. 

8.        For students that finish early they can draw another picture, or they can silently read. 

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will draw a picture of a mountain, volcano, and hill and identify the differences between them. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will regularly assess for understanding by asking questions.  The teacher will assess for individual understanding by collecting the students drawings of the mountain, volcano, and hill with the differences between them written. 

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day the students will be discussing other landforms: forests, deserts, and prairies.

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 How to make Play dough at home:

Cooked Playdough (flour and salt)

3 cups flour
1.5 cups salt
6 tsp cream of tarter
3 tbsp oil
3 cups water

Pour all ingredients into a large pot.  Stir constantly over medium heat until a ball forms by pulling away from the sides.  Knead the play dough until the texture matches play dough (1-2 minutes).

Store in plastic container.  Should last for at least 3 months.

http://www.creativekidsathome.com/activities/activity_8.html#Cooked%20(flour%20and%20salt)

 

 Making a Hill:

 

Supplies you will need:

Play dough

Cardboard to build on

Ruler to measure your base and height. 

 

Make a model of a hill.  Your base should be 30 millimeters.  Your height should be 24 millimeters.  

 Make a Mountain:

 

Supplies you will need:

Play dough

Cardboard to build on

Ruler to measure your base and height. 

 

Make a model of a mountain.  Your base should be 60 millimeters.  Your height should be 40 millimeters.  

 Make a Volcano:

 

Supplies you will need:

Play dough

Cardboard to build on

Ruler to measure your base and height. 

 

Make a model of a volcano.  Your base should be 60 millimeters.  Your height should be 35 millimeters.  At the top of the volcano make a hole for the eruption sight. 

 Lesson 4

 

Prairies, Deserts, and Forests

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential / Driving Question: What are prairies, deserts, and forests?  

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Reading:

EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read.

Component 2.1: Demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension.

2.1.4 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for information al and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: use prior knowledge.

2.1.6 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for information and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: monitor for meaning, create mental images and generate and answer questions.

2.1.7 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for informational and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: determine importance and summarize the text.

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will identify what prairies, deserts, and forests are.

2.        The third grade students will listen to books on prairies, deserts, and forests paying close attention to the landscapes.

3.        The third grade students will look at pictures of prairies, deserts, and forests and find similarities and differences between them. 

4.        The third grade students will create a model of each habitat.

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   There is no use of technology for this lesson.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will ask the students to: “Remember back to the peninsula that they came across a few days ago.  The one with a volcano on it.”  This peninsula is covered with I beautiful forest.  What is a forest?  What would it look like?  What if it was a prairie instead?  What would that look like?  How about a desert?  What would that look like?  Then the teacher will read: A Little Prairie House (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Forest Bright, Forest Night (Sharing Nature with Children Book)  by Jennifer Ward, and Deserts by Gail Gibbson, asking the students to pay close attention to the landscapes.  Then the teacher will lead a discussion on the similarities and differences of the landscapes.  Make sure to tell the students that there are more than one type of forest and that later the will be taken a closer look at some of them.       

RATIONALE

Prairies, forests, and deserts are important landscapes that we find on the Earth, and the students need to understand what the differences are between them.

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Inquiry Method

 

    Listen to stories

 

Individual:

     Make a model

    

 

 

 

 

 

The students will be using the inquiry method throughout the lesson to discuss what they already know and what they are learning about prairies, forests, and deserts.

The students will be listening to stories that are set in and describe what prairies, forests, and deserts are. 

 

Individually the students will be asked to make a model of a prairie, forest, and desert.   

 

 

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

1.        Discussing what they had learned from prior classes about mountains, volcanoes, and hills.  

2.        Discuss the similarities and differences between forests, deserts, and prairies. 

3.        Make a model of a forest, desert, and prairie:  To do this each student will be given three plastic cups, dark soil, broccoli (for trees) and/or model trees, dots (green and yellow for mountains), dry dirt, model cactuses, model sagebrush, or balls of green fabric that is formed like sagebrush, grass, and glue make everything stay inside the cup. 

4.        For students that finish this task early they will be asked to write down what are the characteristics of these three different landforms, and what are the similarities between them.  

 

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will make their models of a forest, desert, and plains using the materials that they are given.   

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will regularly assess for understanding by asking questions.  The teacher will assess for individual understanding by collecting the students models of the three landscapes.            

   FOLLOW-UP

The next day students will be choosing books to read in there book groups that deal with prairies, deserts, or forests.     

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

Lesson 5

 

Prairies, Deserts, and Forests Reading Groups

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential / Driving Question: What are prairies, deserts, and forests?  

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Reading:

EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read.

Component 2.1: Demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension.

2.1.4 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for information al and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: use prior knowledge.

2.1.6 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for information and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: monitor for meaning, create mental images and generate and answer questions.

2.1.7 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies for informational and technical materials, complex narratives, and expositions: determine importance and summarize the text.

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The students will read a book, that takes place in either a prairie, desert, or forest, to connect to people that live in different habitats. 

2.        The students will complete a project in their group to share with the rest of the class what their book was about and what they learned about the habitat that their story took place in.  

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   There is no use of technology for this lesson.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will have the students get into their reading groups.  Then the teacher will give each group a picture of a prairie, desert, and forest.  The teacher will have the students discuss the similarities and differences between the three different landforms.  Then group by group the teacher will discuss their book choices.  The lower reading group will choose between:  A. These Happy Golden Years (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wilder for age group 4-8 years old B. Ali, Child of the Desert by Jonathan London, and C. How the Forest Grew by William Jaspersohn.  The middle group will choose between: A: Little Town on the Prairie (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wiler for age group 9-12.  B. The Secret of the Desert Stone by Frank Peretti, and C. Tales of Dark Forest Trollogy by Barlow.  The higher group will choose between:  A. Riddle of the Prairie Bride by Kathryn Reiss.  B. Explores Wanted! In the Desert by Simon Chapman, and C. The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter.  The students will choose how they want to share their book with the rest of the class during another class time after they have started their reading.  

RATIONALE

Prairies, forests, and deserts are important landscapes that we find on the Earth, and the students need to understand what the differences are between them.  Also reading creates connections for the students. 

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Small group:

     Discussion

     Choose a book

 

   

    

 

 

 

 

 

The students will discuss the pictures and the characteristics of a prairie, desert, and forest. 

The students will chose what book they want to read are form smaller groups within the larger reading group according to the book they have chosen.

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

1.        Discussing pictures on prairies, deserts, and forests.

2.        Listening to the presentation on the different books that are available for their group.

3.        Choosing the book that they want to read.

4.        Figuring out a timeline on when they need to have the book read by.

5.        For groups that get done early they can discuss the pictures on prairies, deserts, and forests and if they are done with that then they can individually write a short story that takes place in one of these habitats.     

 

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will discuss in the small groups a schedule to complete their book in two weeks.      

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will regularly assess for understanding by asking questions.  The teacher will assess for book reading after the students present their book to the rest of the class.               

   FOLLOW-UP

The students will be completing a culminating project to insure that they understand what continents, islands, peninsulas, mountains, volcanoes, hills, prairies, deserts, and forests are.  There will also be more lessons on landforms, looking at plateaus, buttes, and mesas next.  

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

 

7.  Accommodations for Diverse Learners

Accommodations for Diverse Learners

 

There are many things that can be done in a classroom to help students learn.

Among them are:

          Establish rules in the classroom.

          Be consistent in applying the rules to every person all the time.

          Interact with the student by: eye contact, calling their name etc.

          Place student in the front, or near positive peers, or in low distracting areas.

          Reduce external visual & auditory stimuli.

          Repeat & have the student paraphrase the directions.

          Give short directions.

          Use predetermined signals.

          Use multiple modalities for different learning styles.

          Have natural & logical consequences for behavior modification.

          Develop learning contracts with the student.

          Use environmental clues such as prompts, steps, written lists, schedules.

          Demonstrate acceptable ways to communicate displeasure, anger, frustration & pleasure.

There are many more things that can be done to help accommodate learning problems or differences in students. Asking for help from the professionals in the school or other teachers is always a good plan as well. Essentially, being aware of who is in the class and what specifically would help him/her, and then doing that accommodation, is necessary in any successful classroom.

8.  Technology

Technology is not needed for this lesson.  

9.  Parent Involvement

The teacher will be including that the class will be doing a unit on landforms for science, in the monthly newsletter. 

10.  Culminating activity for unit

Sell Me Your Planet:  This assessment has the student make their own planet with the different landforms that we have been discussing and explaining them to sell their planet to the teacher.  The will be making a flyer with a picture of their planet and a description area to sell it to the teacher.     

11.  Culminating Assessment Plan

The culminating activity can be used as the culminating assessment. 

 

 Culminating Activity

 

Sell Me Your Planet 

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential / Driving Question: What is a continent, island, peninsula, mountain, volcano, hill, prairie, desert, and forest?

 

Writing:

  EALR 2. The student writes in a variety of forms for different audiences and purposes.

Component 2.3 Writes in a variety of forms/genres.

2.3.1 Uses a variety of forms/genres.

EALR 3. The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1 Develops ideas and organizes writing.

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

Component 3.2 Uses appropriate style.

3.2.2 Uses language appropriate for a specific audience and purpose.

Component 3.3 Knows and applies writing conventions appropriate for the grade level.

3.3.1 Uses legible handwriting.

3.3.2 Spells words appropriate for the grade level accurately.

3.3.3 Applies capitalization rules.

3.3.4 Applies punctuation rules.

3.3.5 Applies usage rules.

3.3.6 Uses complete sentences in writing.

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.2: Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems. 

1.2.4 Understand that Earth’s system includes a mostly solid interior, landforms, bodies of water, and an atmosphere.

          (3) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and landforms on a globe or a map (e.g., continents, oceans, rivers, mountains).

EALR 2 – Inquiry: The student knows and applies the skills, processes, and nature of scientific inquiry.

Component 2.1:  Investigation Systems: Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to do scientific inquiry.

2.1.4 Understand how to use simple models to represent objects, events, systems, and processes. 

          (3, 4, 5) List similarities and model and what the model represents.

          (3, 4, 5) Create a simple model to represent common objects, events, systems, or processes.

          (3, 4, 5) Investigate phenomena using a simple physical or computer model or simulation.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will identify what a continent, island, peninsula, mountain, volcano, hill, prairie, desert, and forest are.  

2.        The third grade students will draw their own planet with landforms and explain what they are. 

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve the student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   There is no use of technology for this lesson.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will ask the students questions to review: “What is a continent?  An island?  How about a peninsula?  What is the difference between a mountain, a hill, and a volcano?  What defines a prairie?  A desert? How about a forest?  What are some examples of these that we have seen around us?

RATIONALE

It is important to assess that the students understand the concepts that we have been going over before moving on to another concept. 

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Inquiry Method

 

 

Individual:

     Draw a picture

    

 

 

 

 

 

The students will be using the inquiry method at the beginning to review the concepts we have been discussing. 

 

 

Individually the students will be drawing a planet that incorporates continents, islands, peninsula, mountain, volcano, and/or hill, prairie, forest, and/or desert. 

 

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

1.        Reviewing the concepts they have been learning.

2.        Drawing their own planet.

3.        Justify the parts of their planet.  

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material. 

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The closing is the drawing of their own planet. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will asses for understanding when the students are reviewing, by listening and observing the students.  The final assessment will be through their drawing of their own planet. 

   FOLLOW-UP

The following lesson will be looking at different types of landforms: plateaus, buttes, and mesas. 

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 Sell Me Your Planet!!!!

 

We are going into the future.  In the future people don’t buy houses any more, now they buy whole planets.  You are a real-estate agent.  You need to create your own planet that you are going to sell to me.  This planet must have at least 1 continent, 1 island, and 1 peninsula.  It must also have either a mountain, hill, or volcano (it can have more than 1).  And it must be either a desert planet, a plains planet, or a forest planet. 

 

Because you are a real-estate agent you need to create a flyer to sell your planet.  You need to name your plant, and land (such as the continent), and every mountain, hill, or volcano.  You must put these names on the picture. 

 

You also need to tell me why I want to buy your planet.  What is the benefit to having a forest planet, or a plains planet, or a desert planet (what are the differences)?

 

Also I might not be familiar with all the parts of your planet, so you need to tell me what all the terms mean (like what is a continent?) 

 

Create your planet on a blank piece of paper and put your name on the back of it. 

 

Don’t forget to price your planet!

 

Good luck, I hope yours is the one that I buy!

 

 

12.  Materials List

Materials

 

  • Copies of the pre-assessment map
  • Map of the world
  • Risk game boards (one for each table)
  • Paper pieces for game pieces
  • Dice (for each table)
  • Stack of questions (for each table)
  • Copies of the directions for the Continent Game (for each table)
  • Paper
  • Ruler (for each table)
  • Lot of play dough
  • Cardboard for building on (one for each table)
  • Copies of instructions (each group gets one, make sure that there are at least one mountain, hill, and volcano)
  • A Little Prairie House (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  •  Forest Bright, Forest Night (Sharing Nature with Children Book) by Jennifer Ward
  • Deserts by Gail Gibbson
  • Three plastic cups (per student)
  • Broccoli
  • Model trees
  • Dots (green and yellow)
  • Dark soil
  • Dry Dirt
  • Model cactuses
  • Model sagebrush or balls of green fabric that are formed like sagebrush
  • Grass
  • Glue
  • Paper
  • These Happy Golden Years (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • Ali, Child of the Desert by Jonathan London
  • How the Forest Grew by William Jaspersohn
  • Little Town on the Prairie (Little House) by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • The Secret of the  Desert Stone by Frank Peretti
  • Tales of Dark Forest Trollogy by Barlow
  • Riddle of the Prairie Bride by Kathryn Reiss
  • Explores Wanted!  In the Desert by Simon Chapman
  • The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter
  • Copies of instructions for the culminating assignment

13.  Biblio-graphy of Re-sources

References:

 

(2007). Creative Kids at Home. Retrieved August 9, 2007, from Homemade Playdough for children Web site: http://www.creativekidsathome.com/activities/activity_8.html#Cooked%20

(flour%20and%20salt)

 

Encyclozine. Retrieved August 9, 2007, Web site: http://encyclozine.com/Reference/Maps/World/BlankMap-World.png

 

Retrieved August 9, 2007, Web site: http://cocoon.ifs.tuwien.ac.at/images/show/dubai_2006/desert/08-Hill%20in%20the%20Desert.jpg

 

Retrieved August 9, 2007, Web site: http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/7831/boardon5.png

 

Retrieved August 9, 2007, Web site: http://volcano.und.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/north_america/hawaii/MaunaKea1.jpg

 

Retrieved August 9, 2007, Web site: http://www.rickriordan.com/landforms.jpg

 

14.  Unit Plan Reflection

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate the learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this unit again?