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Multiplication Unit Plan for Math

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Math Unit Plan: Multiplication for a Third Grade Class

 

ETC 541

 

Mathematics: Concepts & Methods

 

Masters in Teaching Program

 

City University, Everett

 

June 27, 2007

 

 Multiplication Unit Plan

 

Sequence

Description

1.  Goals, Objectives and EALRs/GLEs

Essential Question: How can multiplication help us in our everyday life?

 

Learning Target: Understand the skill of multiplying using several manipulatives.

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concept and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.1: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from number sense.

GLE Grade 3

1.1.5: Understand the meaning of multiplication and division of whole numbers. 

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using several manipulatives, by working through problems created by the teacher.

 

2.  Rationale

Understanding how to multiply is an important skill that is helpful in quickly figuring out math problems that come up in the real world.   

3.  Content Outline

Lesson 1: Multiplying Using Beans.  Students will learn what arrays are and how multiplying can make math easier.  Students will also know that multiplying is used in the real world. 

 

Lesson 2: Multiplying Using FLU.  Students will use the FLU materials to better their understanding of multiplication.

 

Lesson 3: Multiplying Using Drawings.  Students will move away from a semi-concrete item to a semi-abstract way of understanding multiplying. 

4.  Sequential List of Lesson Objectives

Lesson 1: The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using beans, by working through problems created by the teacher. 

 

Lesson 2: The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using FLU, by working through problems created by the teacher.

 

Lesson 3: The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using own drawings, by working through problems created by the teacher.

5.  Pre-Assessment Plan

The students will complete a worksheet that assesses their understanding of multiplication.  Also the teacher will have assessed other math skills to insure that the students are ready to comprehend multiplication. 

6.  Four Sequential Instructional Plans

 

Lesson 1

 

Multiplying Using Beans

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: How can multiplication help us in our everyday life?

 

Learning Target: Understand the skill of multiplying using beans.

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concept and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.1: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from number sense.

GLE Grade 3

1.1.5: Understand the meaning of multiplication and division of whole numbers. 

 

Behavioral objective:

2.        The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using beans, by working through problems created by the teacher.

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will give the students a worksheet that assess prior knowledge.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will get the students attention by using an established sign of holding up a number of fingers, saying can I have your attention, putting down hand, and then having the students raise up the same number of fingers to show that they are giving the teacher their attention.  Next the teacher will give the purpose of learning multiplication.  The teacher will tell them that “knowing how to multiply is helpful in many different ways in the real world, some of which we will look at today in scenarios.”  The teacher will then hand out the beans, then let the children play with them for a few minutes, and then get their attention using the established sign again.        

RATIONALE

Understanding how to multiply is an important skill that is helpful in quickly figuring out math problems that come up in the real world.    

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

 

The teacher will model how to multiply using the beans by talking through a multiplication problem.  The problem that the teacher will pose is: “I’m building a deck; I need 8 boards to make it the size that I want the deck.  Each board is nailed using 4 nails, how many nails do I need?  The teacher will instruct the students to put down eight rows of four beans telling them that “the beans are going to stand for nails in this problem.”  The teacher will have also put the beans in eight rows of four on the overhead.  The teacher will give the students adequate time to complete their array and have them write down their answer on their own math board.  When most or all of the students have finished the problem the teacher will walk through the problem with them.  The teacher will show the students what she has come up with on the overhead.  She will then count all of the beans and come up with 32 beans.  Then she will tell the students that “this is set up in an array; an array is when you have columns and rows.  This problem can be done by multiplying the amount of boards or rows of beans by the amount of columns of nails or beans.  That would be 8 groups of 4 or 8 times 4 which is 32.  It is much faster to be able to multiply 8 times 4 than counting all of the boars or adding 4+4+4+4+4+4+4+4.  This is why it is so important to be able to multiply.  The teacher then will tell the students that she will be going through one more problem with them and then they are going to have two problems to do on their own. 

 

Suggested questions that the teacher can use:

 

  1. Sally has 5 friends and each friend has three warm gooey hot chocolate chip cookies.  How many cookies are there in all? 5x3=15
  2. Hailey is helping her mom get ready for dinner.  Her mom asks her to help by putting 3 red juicy cherry tomatoes and some grated cheese on each salad.  If there are 6 salads, then how many tomatoes will she need? 3x6=18
  3. Joe collects baseball cards.  He gets them in bubble gum packs.  Each gum pack has 6 cards in it.  Joe bought 5 packs of gum, how many cards did he add to his collection?  6x3=30

       

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Practicing the skill of multiplying using beans with the teacher.
  2. Practicing the skill of multiplying using beans on own.
  3. Showing their answer to the teacher from own math board all at the same time.
  4. Explaining their answer on a piece of paper that the teacher will collect.
  5. Explaining their answer to the class if called on.

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning, the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning using math boards, and through questioning student’s answers.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material. 

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The teacher will ask the students to write on the bottom of their paper that is going to be turned in one thing that they learned about multiplying and why it is helpful to know how to multiply. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will assess throughout the lesson by walking around the classroom and observing what the students are doing.  The teacher will also assess throughout the lesson by having the students show their answers on their math boards.  The teacher will also assess by asking “why” the students came up with the answer that they did.  As a final assessment the teacher will collect a paper from the students that shows their answers and reasoning for their answers in writing.

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day the teacher will ask the students to think about what they learned about multiplication the day before.  Then the teacher will have the students share with the person next to them what they learned.  The teacher will then have another lesson on multiplication using FLU manipulative.    

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

Lesson 2

 

Multiplying Using FLU

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: How can multiplication help us in our everyday life?

 

Learning Target: Understand the skill of multiplying using Flats, Longs, and Unites (FLU).

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concept and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.1: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from number sense.

GLE Grade 3

1.1.5: Understand the meaning of multiplication and division of whole numbers. 

 

Behavioral objective:

3.        The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using FLU, by working through problems created by the teacher.

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  The teacher will use the prior lesson to assess the student’s prior knowledge.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will get the students attention by using an established sign of holding up a number of fingers, saying can I have your attention, putting down hand, and then having the students raise up the same number of fingers to show that they are giving the teacher their attention.  Next the teacher will ask the students to think about what they learned about multiplication the day before.  Then the teacher will have the students share with the person next to them what they learned.  The teacher will then tell the students that “today we are going to use another hands on device to understand multiplication.  The teacher will tell the students that what they will be using is the FLU which they have used for addition and subtraction earlier in the year.  Then the teacher will hand out the FLU, and then let the children play with them for a few minutes, after that the teacher will get their attention using the established sign again.        

RATIONALE

Understanding how to multiply is an important skill that is helpful in quickly figuring out math problems that come up in the real world.    

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

 

The teacher will model how to multiply using the FLU by talking through a multiplication problem.  The problem that the teacher will pose is: “There are 55 M&M’s in each package.   I only like the blue, red, and brown M&M’s though and there are 30 of those colors, so when I get a package of M&M’s I only eat 30.  If I have 3 bags of M&M’s, then how many blue, red, and brown M&M’s will I have?  The teacher will instruct the students to put down 3 rows of 30 FLU telling them that “the FLU are going to stand for M&M’s in this problem.”  The teacher will have also put the FLU up in 3 rows of 30 on the overhead.  The teacher will give the students adequate time to complete their array and have them write down their answer on their own math board.  When most or all of the students have finished the problem the teacher will walk through the problem with them.  The teacher will show the students what she has come up with on the overhead.  She will then count all of the beans and come up with 90 FLU insuring that she counts by tens.  When she gets done she will tell the students “skip counting by tens is kind of like multiply, multiplying 10 times the amount.  This problem is a little bit harder because we are skip counting by 30 and that is the basic concept of multiplying.  The teacher then will tell the students that she will be going through one more problem with them and then they are going to have two problems to do on their own. 

 

Suggested questions that the teacher can use:

 

  1. Molly goes to the store.  She is going to make deviled eggs for a party and there are going to be a lot of people at this party.  She knows that there are 12 eggs in each container.  She decided to buy 2 containers, how many eggs will she end up with?  12x2=24
  2. Kelly really likes chicken mcnuggets from McDonalds.  There are 10 mcnuggets in each containers.  In one week Kelly had 4 containers of mcnuggets, how many mcnuggets did she have that week? 10x4=40
  3. Tyler and Brandon are having a party.  There will be a total of 20 people there.  They are going to make 3 hotdogs for each person at the party.  How many hotdogs will they need to buy?

       

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Practicing the skill of multiplying using FLU with the teacher.
  2. Practicing the skill of multiplying using FLU on own.
  3. Showing their answer to the teacher from own math board all at the same time.
  4. Explaining their answer on a piece of paper that the teacher will collect.
  5. Explaining their answer to the class if called on.

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning, the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning using math boards, and through questioning student’s answers.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material. 

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The teacher will ask the students think to themselves something that they discovered about multiplication that day.  Then the teacher will have them share it with their table groups and then share one thing from the table with the rest of the class.    

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will assess throughout the lesson by walking around the classroom and observing what the students are doing.  The teacher will also assess throughout the lesson by having the students show their answers on their math boards.  The teacher will also assess by asking “why” the students came up with the answer that they did.  As a final assessment the teacher will collect a paper from the students that shows their answers and reasoning for their answers in writing.

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day the teacher will ask the students to remember back to yesterday and how we multiplied using the FLU.  The teacher will then ask them to picture in their heads with their eyes closed what a problem like John is helping his mom organize.  He finds 2 packages of tacks, if there are 10 tacks in each package, then how many tacks are there?  When they can imagine this and they think they know the answer then the teacher will have them put their thumbs up.  Once most or all the students think they have the answer the teacher will have them open their eyes and show them on the overhead this problem using FLU and then also pull out 2 packages of 10 tacks and show the students what that looks like.  The teacher will then have another lesson on multiplication using a drawing worksheet.    

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

Lesson 3

 

Multiplying Using Drawings

 

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: How can multiplication help us in our everyday life?

 

Learning Target: Understand the skill of multiplying using drawings.

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concept and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.1: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from number sense.

GLE Grade 3

1.1.5: Understand the meaning of multiplication and division of whole numbers. 

 

Behavioral objective:

4.        The third grade students will understand the skill of multiplying using drawings, by working through problems created by the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  The teacher will use the prior lesson to assess the student’s prior knowledge.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will get the students attention by using an established sign of holding up a number of fingers, saying can I have your attention, putting down hand, and then having the students raise up the same number of fingers to show that they are giving the teacher their attention.  Next the teacher will ask the students to remember back to yesterday and how we multiplied using the FLU.  The teacher will then ask them to picture in their heads with their eyes closed what a problem like John is helping his mom organize.  He finds 2 packages of tacks, if there are 10 tacks in each package, then how many tacks are there?  When they can imagine this and they think they know the answer then the teacher will have them put their thumbs up.  Once most or all the students think they have the answer the teacher will have them open their eyes and show them on the overhead this problem using FLU and then also pull out 2 packages of 10 tacks and show the students what that looks like.  Then the teacher will say “today we are going to multiply by using our own drawings.”  The teacher will then pass out the worksheet with the questions on them.            

RATIONALE

Understanding how to multiply is an important skill that is helpful in quickly figuring out math problems that come up in the real world.    

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

 

The teacher will model how to multiply using drawings by reading the first problem which is “Bob enjoys going down to the beach to collect sea shells.  Every time he goes he collects exactly 7 sea shells.  He went down three times last week, how many sea shells did he collect last week?”  The teacher will then draw out the problem as she talks through it.  The teacher will then walk through one or two of the problems that are included with this lesson.  Then the students will work through the remainder of the problems, but they should not be pushed to finish.  The teacher should say “we are going to do this for about 15 minutes I want you to get through as many problems that you can in that time, but quality is more important than quantity.”  Also the teacher should have activity for those that finish before time is up. 

       

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Practicing the skill of multiplying using drawings with the teacher.
  2. Practicing the skill of multiplying using drawings on own.
  3. Completing and turning in as many answers as possible in the time allotted, explaining their answers also.   

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning, the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material. 

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The teacher will ask one of the students that she knows got the right answer to share their answer with the rest of the class, and then the teacher will collect the worksheets.     

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The teacher will assess throughout the lesson by walking around the classroom and observing what the students are doing.  The teacher will also assess by collecting the worksheets to asses for understanding.

   FOLLOW-UP

The next day the teacher will have the students write out their own multiplication problem and then solve it using drawings.      

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

Draw the Multiplication Problem

 

Name: _________________________________________________________________

 

For the following problems read them carefully.  In the space provided draw a picture to represent what the math problem would look like.  Use your drawing to figure out your answer.  Then in words tell me how you solved the problem.  Remember quality is more important than quantity!

 

1)      Bob enjoys going down to the beach to collect sea shells.  Every time he goes he collects exactly 7 sea shells.  He went down three times last week, how many sea shells did he collect last week?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)      Alice and six of her friends are going to go and see a movie at the movie theater.  Alice told her friends that she would go down and buy the 7 tickets in the afternoon so that they would be sure to be able to see the movie.  Each movie ticket cost $10, how much money will it cost her to buy all of the tickets?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3)      Sam has 3 sisters: Sally, Helen, and Kay.  Each of his sisters has 4 ugly yellow dresses, how may dresses do they have in all?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4)      Jane has four cats: Silky, Stinky, Sleepy, and Paws.  Each cat has 2 toys, how many toys are there in total?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5)      Billy loves to collect Yugioh cards.  Every time he buys them he gets 4 packs.  Each pack has 5 cards.  How many cards does he get when he buys them?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6)      Jeannie does not like string beans, but her mom makes her eat them because they are good for her.  When her mom buys them at Costco there are six cans to a case.  Last time her mom bought 3 cases, how many cans did her mom buy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7)  Lora is making cupcakes.  She is making them for a total of 20 people.  She wants to make enough for each person to have 4 cupcakes, how many cupcakes does Lora need to make?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.  Accommodations for Diverse Learners

Accommodations for Diverse Learners

 

There are many things that can be done in a classroom to help students learn.

Among them are:

          Establish rules in the classroom.

          Be consistent in applying the rules to every person all the time.

          Interact with the student by: eye contact, calling their name etc.

          Place student in the front, or near positive peers, or in low distracting areas.

          Reduce external visual & auditory stimuli.

          Repeat & have the student paraphrase the directions.

          Give short directions.

          Use predetermined signals.

          Use multiple modalities for different learning styles.

          Have natural & logical consequences for behavior modification.

          Develop learning contracts with the student.

          Use environmental clues such as prompts, steps, written lists, schedules.

          Demonstrate acceptable ways to communicate displeasure, anger, frustration & pleasure.

There are many more things that can be done to help accommodate learning problems or differences in students. Asking for help from the professionals in the school or other teachers is always a good plan as well. Essentially, being aware of who is in the class and what specifically would help him/her, and then doing that accommodation, is necessary in any successful classroom.

 

8.  Technology

The teacher will use an overhead projector to show the students examples.  The students will not be using any technology. 

9.  Parent Involvement

There will not be any Parent involvement that is needed for this unit.  In the monthly newsletter to parents the teacher will include that in math we will be moving into multiplication. 

10.  Culminating activity for unit

The culminating activity for this unit is the third lesson.

11.  Culminating Assessment Plan

The culminating assessment will be the worksheet that is included in the third lesson. 

12.  Materials List

Materials

  • Beans
  • Cups for the beans
  • FLU
  • Copies of the worksheet from the third lesson
  • Pencils
  • Paper
  • Overhead
  • Overhead Pens
  • Two packages (can be bags) of ten tacks

13.  Bibliography of Resources

None needed

14.  Unit Plan Reflection

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this unit again?