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Sequencing Unit

This is a unit on sequencing.

Sequencing Unite Plan: for a Third Grade Class

ETC 519

Curriculum & Instructional Methods

Master in Teaching Program

City University, Everett

                                                June 3, 2007


MIT Unit Plan Format

Sequencing

Sequence

Description

1.  Goals, Objectives and EALRs/GLEs

Essential Question: How do sequences help us understand the world? 

 

Goal: To understand the importance of a sequence.

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.4: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from probability and statistics

1.4.4 Understand, determine, and use mode to describe a set of data.

 

EALR 2: The student uses mathematics to define and solve problems

Component 2.2: Construct solutions.

2.2.1 Select and use relevant information to construct solutions.   

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.1: Properties: Understand how properties are used to identify, describe, and categorize substances, materials, and objects and how characteristics are used to categorize living things.

1.1.2 Understand the relative position and motion of objects.

         Measure and describe the position of one object relative to another object (or surroundings) using

         Positional language (such as in front of, behind, to the left, to the right, above, and below) and a distance scale (such as centimeters).

 

Writing:

EALR 3: The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1: Develops ideas and organizes writing

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

         Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

         Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Behavioral Objectives:

  1. The third grade students will arrange in sequential order individuals on whom they might depend on.
  2. The third grade students will identify using complete sentences the reason why they sequenced in the particular order.

3.      The third grade student will create their own sequence of people in the community and write about the sequence.

4.      The Third grade students will select an animal or insect that goes through life changes.

5.       The third grade students will classify the animal or insect by the different stages of its growth.

6.      The third grade student will draw and illustration of the life cycle of their animal or insect.    

  1. The third grade students will write a complete sentence on one of the sequences of events in the story.

8.      The third grade students will work with their classmates to discover the sequence of events by putting the illustrations and sentences in order on the class timeline.

9.      The third grade student will write journal entries about how finding the sequence in a story helps increase their understanding of the story. 

  1. The third grade students will gather information about their own life from their parents.

11.  The third grade students will go to the computer lab and create their own timeline on the computer. 

12.  The third grade students will demonstrate comprehension by completing a selected response test on the unit.  

 

2.  Rationale

It is important to teach this because sequences are important to understanding jobs, life cycles, reading, and many other things.   

3.  Content Outline

Lesson 1: Lean on Me: Sequences in the Community—Students will learn what a sequence is.  They will learn about sequences in a community and how people work together to get a job completed.  Then they will complete a worksheet and take home an activity to complete with their family.

 

Lesson 2: Sequential Drawings of Life Cycles – Students will talk about life cycles that they have learned about in the past and then they will draw a life cycle of their choice.  This activity can be used as a bulletin board.

 

Lesson 3: Sequencing for Better Reading Comprehension – The teacher will read a story to the students, such as Paul Bunyan.  The students will then pick out the main events of the story and the teacher will write them on the board.  The students will be placed in groups to write and illustrate one part of the story.  When this is done they will be divided into beginning, middle, and end of the story group.  From there the students need to put their event of the story in order.  Finally they will read their part of the story to the rest of the class in order. 

 

Lesson 4:  Culminating assessment/ Sequences of Student’s Lives: Your Very Own Timeline – The students will be reminded of what sequences are and they will have completed a homework assignment with their family that will help them put together their own timeline of their lives.  The students will then be directed to go into the computer lab and make their own life timeline.  The students should print these out and turn them in.  When they are done then they will be given a final assessment on sequencing. 

 

4.  Sequential List of Lesson Objectives

Lesson 1: Knowing about sequences that take place in a community helps the students better understand how things work in order and also provides them with a greater understanding of their community. 

 

Lesson 2: Knowing about sequences helps the students understand cycles of life and how one thing must take place before another can occur.

 

Lesson 3: Understanding the sequence of a book helps the students comprehend what they are reading.  Doing this lesson will help the students comprehend other things that they read.

 

Lesson 4:  Completing a timeline of the student’s lives will allow them to use technology and also make sequencing more personal so that they will retain the concepts they have learned in the unit. 

 

5.  Pre-Assessment Plan

The teacher will ask the students, “who has heard of the word sequence?  Thumbs up or thumbs down.”  Then the teacher will tell the students what a sequence is.

6.  Four Sequential Instructional Plans

 

 

Lesson 1

Lean on Me: Sequences in the Community

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: What ways do sequences affect everyday life? 

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.4: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from probability and statistics

1.4.4 Understand, determine, and use mode to describe a set of data.

 

EALR 2: The student uses mathematics to define and solve problems

Component 2.2: Construct solutions.

2.2.1 Select and use relevant information to construct solutions.   

 

Social Studies:

EALR 2: Interpersonal and Group Process Skills.

Component 2.1: Understand and use interpersonal and group process skills required by citizens in a democratic society.

2.1.1b Identify roles of different members of a group, serve in different roles in a group.

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.                                                                                            Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.                                                                                                            

 3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

Writing:

EALR 3: The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1: Develops ideas and organizes writing

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

 

Behavioral objectives:

  1. The third grade students will arrange in sequential order individuals on whom they might depend on.
  2. The third grade students will identify using complete sentences the reason why they sequenced in the particular order.
  3. The third grade student will create their own sequence of people in the community and write about the sequence.  

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will ask the students, “have any of you heard of a sequence before, raise your hand for yes?”

 

CLASSROOM

 

The students and the teacher created the classroom rules at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewarding good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Families will be involved when the students are asked to go home and talk to a family member about sequence of events that take place in their job.    

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will ask the students, “who has heard of the word sequence?  Thumbs up or thumbs down.”  Then the teacher will tell the students what a sequence is.

 

RATIONALE

Knowing about sequences that take place in a community helps the students better understand how things work in order and also provides them with a greater understanding of their community. 

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Direct instruction

 

     Think/Pair/Share

 

 

Small group:

     Think/Pair/Share

 

Individual:

     Thumbs up/    

        thumbs down

 

     Selected

        response

 

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will use direct instruction when explaining what a sequence is and how we use it in our community.

Another large group activity will be used throughout the lesson is Think, Pair and Share when they are sharing the ideas that they came up with on sequences and communities.

 

 

The students will also be using Think, Pair and Share as a small group activity.  This will be done to relate the larger knowledge base and comparing and contrasting each others experiences in pairs.

 

The teacher will ask yes or no questions and ask for the students individual response by having them put thumbs up for yes, or thumbs down, for no.  This thumbs up/ thumbs down method also allow the teacher to assess student’s dispositions of the lesson.

 

The students will be required to complete an individual selected response activity of coloring and cutting out and sequencing a worksheet.    

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Discussing with the class what sequences are.
  2. Listening to examples of sequences within the community.
  3. Evaluating if something is in a sequence or not.
  4. Coming up with their own sequences.
  5. Completing a worksheet activity to put events into a sequence.
  6. Explaining why they put these events into sequence.
  7. Coming up with their own sequence and writing about sequences.

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through thumbs up/down, and through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The teacher will ask the students to write down one thing that they learned today about sequencing and their community.

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

Students will be asked to complete a worksheet that requires them to color pictures of events that take place in the community to complete a task.  The students will then cut these out and put them in the correct sequence.  When they are finished they will be asked to writing a justification of why they put them in that particular order.  Lastly they will be writing out their own sequence.  For extra credit the student can draw a picture of the sequence they created, if time permits.  The worksheet will be corrected in class but they will be collected to check students understanding. 

   FOLLOW-UP

There will be a family assignment sent home for the students to complete with their parent about their parent’s job.  The next day we will have the students that want to share with their classmates what they learned from their family assignment.   

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

For the cut out picture activity for this lesson go to this website http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM446&page=teacher

And print out order activity one and order activity two under the second lesson on that page. 

  

Lesson 2

Sequential Drawings of Life Cycles

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: In what ways do sequences and life cycles play in our lives?

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.4: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from probability and statistics

1.4.4 Understand, determine, and use mode to describe a set of data.

 

EALR 2: The student uses mathematics to define and solve problems

Component 2.2: Construct solutions.

2.2.1 Select and use relevant information to construct solutions.   

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.1: Properties: Understand how properties are used to identify, describe, and categorize substances, materials, and objects and how characteristics are used to categorize living things.

1.1.2 Understand the relative position and motion of objects.

          Measure and describe the position of one object relative to another object (or surroundings) using

          Positional language (such as in front of, behind, to the left, to the right, above, and below) and a distance scale (such as centimeters).

Component 1.2:  Structures: Understand how components, structures, organizations, and interconnections describe systems.

1.2.7 Understand the life cycles of plants and animals and the differences between inherited and acquired characteristics.

          Observe and describe the life cycle of a plant or animal.

          (Describe that the young of plants and animals grow to resemble their parents as they mature into adults.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Behavioral objective:

1.        The Third grade students will select an animal or insect that goes through life changes.

2.         The third grade students will classify the animal or insect by the different stages of its growth.

3.        The third grade student will draw and illustration of the life cycle of their animal or insect.  

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

 

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will ask the students to share with they neighbor what they found out about their parents’ jobs and sequences.  When they have had a few minutes to do this the teacher will then call for their attention and tell them that “today we are going to learn about a different type of sequence.”  Then the teacher will ask someone to remind everyone else what a sequence is.  Then the teacher will tell the students, “today we are going to look at animals and cycles of life which is also a sequence, because certain things have to happen before the next step can occur. Like a frog has to be a tad-pool before it can become an adult frog.” 

 

RATIONALE

Knowing about sequences helps the students understand cycles of life and how one thing must take place before another can occur.

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Direct instruction

 

     Think/Pair/Share

 

Know/Want/Learn

 

 

Small group:

     Think/Pair/Share

 

Individual:

     Thumbs up/    

        thumbs down

 

     Drawing

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will use direct instruction when explaining how sequences are connected to cycles of life.

Another large group activity will be used throughout the lesson is Think, Pair and Share when they are sharing the ideas that they came up with on sequences and life cycles.

The students will be filling out a chart of all the animals and insects that they know that go through life cycles.  To do so the teacher will ask the large group to give her ideas to write up on the board. 

 

 

 

The students will also be using Think, Pair and Share as a small group activity.  This will be done to relate the larger knowledge base and comparing and contrasting each others experiences in pairs.

 

The teacher will ask yes or no questions and ask for the students individual response by having them put thumbs up for yes, or thumbs down, for no.  This thumbs up/ thumbs down method also allow the teacher to assess student’s dispositions of the lesson.

The students will be required to complete an individual drawing of a life cycle of an animal or an insect that takes place in no less than three steps.  If there are more that three steps then they need to choose the three most important steps so that they can put them on the paper available.     

 

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Discussing with classmates what they learned the night before about their parents’ jobs and sequences.
  2. Listing life cycles that they have learned about in the past. 
  3. Choosing what life cycle they want to portray. 
  4. Drawing the life cycle of their choice.

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through thumbs up/down, and through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will have an opportunity to share their life cycle drawings and explain what sequence takes place for this life cycle to occur. 

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

The students will be choosing a life cycle of their choice and drawing it on a paper that is divided into three sections.  When they are finished then they will be allowed to share with others what life cycle they chose and what the sequence is.  This assessment can be displayed as a bulletin board to demonstrate what they class has been working on.      

   FOLLOW-UP

The following day they student’s will be discussing reading comprehension and sequences.  At the start of that lesson the teacher will ask the kids what they remember about sequences in the community and life cycles. 

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

 

You’ll need to draw lines dividing the paper into thirds, if you make them slightly smaller than a regular piece of paper then you can mount them on colorful backgrounds.  

 

Lesson 3

Sequences for Better Reading Comprehension

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: How does sequencing aid in reading comprehension?

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.4: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from probability and statistics

1.4.4 Understand, determine, and use mode to describe a set of data.

 

EALR 2: The student uses mathematics to define and solve problems

Component 2.2: Construct solutions.

2.2.1 Select and use relevant information to construct solutions.   

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.1: Properties: Understand how properties are used to identify, describe, and categorize substances, materials, and objects and how characteristics are used to categorize living things.

1.1.2 Understand the relative position and motion of objects.

          Measure and describe the position of one object relative to another object (or surroundings) using

          Positional language (such as in front of, behind, to the left, to the right, above, and below) and a distance scale (such as centimeters).

 

Writing:

EALR 3: The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1: Develops ideas and organizes writing

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

 

Reading:

EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read.

Component 2.2: Understand and apply knowledge of text components to comprehend text.

2.2.1 Understand sequence in informational/expository text and literary/narrative text.

          Explain story ideas or events in sequential order.  (Note: Differences in story telling order exist between cultures. For example, in some cultures the end of the story is told first.)

          Explain steps in a process (e.g., problem solving in mathematics, life cycle of a butterfly).

          Select, from multiple choices, the order of ideas, facts, events (e.g., what happened first, next, last; the order in which ideas or facts were introduced).

 

Behavioral objectives:

  1. The third grade students will write a complete sentence on one of the sequences of events in the story.

2.        The third grade students will work with their classmates to discover the sequence of events by putting the illustrations and sentences in order on the class timeline.

3.        The third grade student will write journal entries about how finding the sequence in a story helps increase their understanding of the story. 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

CLASSROOM

 

The classroom rules were created by the students and the teacher at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Family involvement is not needed to complete this lesson but they will take home a letter to their parents to receive help for the next lesson.  

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will have the children write down one thing they recall about sequences from the day before.  Then the teacher will tell the students “today we will be learning about how sequences help books make more sense.”  After that the teacher will select a book and start reading from the middle of the book and then go back about three pages and read something else, and then to the end and read that page.   Next the teacher will ask the students to Think, Pair, and Share why we would not want to read a story like that.  

RATIONALE

Understanding the sequence of a book helps the students comprehend what they are reading.  Doing this lesson will help the students comprehend other things that they read.   

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Direct instruction

     Think/Pair/Share

 

     Creating a class    

       timeline

 

Small group:

     Think/Pair/Share

     Small group          

       collaboration

   

 

Individual:

     Thumbs up/    

        thumbs down

     Writing

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will use direct instruction when explaining how sequences are connected to reading.

Another large group activity will be used throughout the lesson is Think, Pair and Share when they are sharing the ideas that they came up with on sequences and reading.

The students will be creating a class timeline of their events from the story and then reading them out-loud.   

 

 

The students will also be using Think, Pair and Share as a small group activity.  This will be done to relate the larger knowledge base and comparing and contrasting each others experiences in pairs.

The students will be working in small groups to discuss the event they have been given of the story and then they will be asked to write a sentence about the event and draw a picture. 

 

 

 

The teacher will ask yes or no questions and ask for the students individual response by having them put thumbs up for yes, or thumbs down, for no.  This thumbs up/ thumbs down method also allow the teacher to assess student’s dispositions of the lesson.

The student will be asked individually to write a journal entry on how finding the sequence in a story helps increase their understanding of the story.  

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Discussing with the classmates what they learned the day before about sequences and life cycles. 
  2. Writing a sentence from an event in the story and drawing a picture about their event.
  3. Getting into a timeline of events. 
  4. Reading their part in the story and listening to others.
  5. Writing a journal reflection on sequencing and stories.   

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through thumbs up/down, and through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will write a journal entry about how finding the sequence in a story helps increase their understanding.   

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

To assess students learning the teacher will listen to the children read their part in the class timeline.  The students will be allowed to correct the story if anyone is not in the correct place.  The students will also write a journal entry that the teacher will collect and read to check for understanding. 

   FOLLOW-UP

The students will take home a homework assignment that is to be completed with a parent on their own timeline.  They will also be asked to pick a book that they are reading or they have read in the past and write down the sequence of events that took place.  This does not need to be a complicated story and they will be asked to bring it back to school with them the next day.    

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

Lesson 4

Sequences of Student’s Lives: Your Very Own Timeline

PLANNING

LEARNING

   TARGETS/EALR(s)

Essential Question: How is my life a sequence?

 

Mathematics:

EALR 1: The student understands and applies the concepts and procedures of mathematics.

Component 1.4: Understand and apply concepts and procedures from probability and statistics

1.4.4 Understand, determine, and use mode to describe a set of data.

 

EALR 2: The student uses mathematics to define and solve problems

Component 2.2: Construct solutions.

2.2.1 Select and use relevant information to construct solutions.   

 

Social Studies:

EALR 3: Critical Thinking Skills.

Component 3.1: Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions.

3.1.2d Investigate cause and effect relationships and their impact on people, environments, and economic systems.

 

Science:

EALR 1 — Systems:  The student knows and applies scientific concepts and principles to understand the properties, structures, and changes in physical, earth/space, and living systems.

Component 1.1: Properties: Understand how properties are used to identify, describe, and categorize substances, materials, and objects and how characteristics are used to categorize living things.

1.1.2 Understand the relative position and motion of objects.

          Measure and describe the position of one object relative to another object (or surroundings) using

          Positional language (such as in front of, behind, to the left, to the right, above, and below) and a distance scale (such as centimeters).

 

Writing:

EALR 3: The student writes clearly and effectively.

Component 3.1: Develops ideas and organizes writing

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects topic, adds detail, and elaborates.

 

The Arts:

EALR 3.  The student communicates through the arts.

Component 3.1: Use the arts to express and present ideas and feelings

          Express personal ideas and feelings through the arts

Component 3.2: Use the arts to communicate for a specific purpose

          Create and/or perform an artwork to communicate for a given purpose with instructor direction

 

Behavioral objectives:

  1. The third grade students will gather information about their own life from their parents.

5.        The third grade students will go to the computer lab and create their own timeline on the computer. 

6.        The third grade students will demonstrate comprehension by completing a selected response test on the unit. 

 

STUDENTS

  

The class is made up of 28 students.  There are 15 male and 13 female students in the class.  There are two ADHD students and three students have a learning disability with reading.  The classroom is arranged in group seating, there are seven groups of four students.  To help the ADHD students and the students with learning disabilities, the teacher will move around the classroom, the teacher will pace the lesson to help them comprehend what is being taught, and the teacher will use multiple modes of teaching by using visuals, handouts, and telling the students what needs to be done.  To assess for prior knowledge of students the teacher will remind the students of the lesson that they did the day before.

 

CLASSROOM

 

The students and the teacher created the classroom rules at the beginning of the year.  The rules are: respect others, listen and follow directions, use kind words/actions/ and manners, hands/feet/objects to self, use appropriate voice level.  To manage the classroom the teacher will monitor the whole class.  The teacher will be consistent with rules.  The teacher will keep interventions brief, clear, and firm.  The teacher will also use statements that preserve student’s dignity.  There is a star system in place for rewards for good behavior.   This lesson does not use technology.  Families will be involved by answering questions about the student’s life.

 

INTRODUCTION

   SET

The teacher will collect the homework on sequences of a book from the students and then ask them to think of one thing they learned and have them write it down.  Then the teacher will ask the students, “did you find out something about yourself last night?  Thumbs up or down.”  After figuring out which students received help from the students the teacher will tell them all that “today we are going to go into the computer lab and make our own sequence of events that took place in our life.”  The teacher will have her own done and will show it on the overhead.  The teacher will provide the students with directions of what to do in the computer lab.  The website that is needed is (http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/timeline/index.html).  The students will be invited to line up to go to the computer lab.  Once they are in there the teacher needs to walk around to make sure the students are all at the correct sight and that they do not have any questions.   

 

RATIONALE

Completing a timeline of the student’s lives will allow them to use technology and also make sequencing more personal so that they will retain the concepts they have learned in the unit.     

 

BODY OF THE LESSON

INSTRUCTIONAL

   STRATEGIES

 

Large group:

     Direct instruction

    

Small group:

    No small group 

      activities will be    

      used.   

 

Individual:

     Thumbs up/    

        thumbs down

 

      Making of 

        timeline    

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will use direct instruction when telling the children what they are going to do in the computer lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The teacher will ask yes or no questions and ask for the students individual response by having them put thumbs up for yes, or thumbs down, for no.  This thumbs up/ thumbs down method also allow the teacher to assess student’s dispositions of the lesson.

The students will be asked to individually make their own life timeline on the computer.  

LEARNING

   EXPERIENCES

Students will actively engage in their own learning by…

  1. Collecting information from their family about their life.
  2. Making a timeline of their life.
  3. Completing a comprehensive unit assessment.   

   MONITORING

To monitor the class and their learning the teacher will walk around the classroom to see if the students are on task.  The teacher will regularly assess for students learning through thumbs up/down, and through general questions.  Students will be asked if they have any questions related to the material.  The teacher will also listen in on group conversations to monitor their understanding.   

CLOSING

   CLOSURE

The students will share their timeline with the person next to them.     

ASSESSMENT

   STRATEGIES

To assess students learning the teacher will collect the timelines.  To assess the unit the teacher will give a selected response assessment.

   FOLLOW-UP

The next day the students will be asked to write in their journals a minimum of a half a page on what sequences are and what different events or items are in sequences.  They will also be asked to reflect on their favorite activity that they did with sequencing in a sentence or two.    

AFTER THE LESSON

REFLECTION

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this lesson again?

 

 Instructions for the next activity:

 

When told to we will line up and go to the computer lab, make sure you have with you the information that you brought from home.

 

When you are at the computer lab you will go to the website:

 

http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/timeline/

 

It will look like this:

 

 

 

 

 

Title: “My Own Timeline”

By: enter your name

Unite of Measure: Choose – Date

 

Then go to “Next Entry”

 

On that page fill out the information that it asks for.  (If you do not know an exact day then just put the year.)

 

When you have finished with that entry go to “Next Entry”.

Fill out the information the same as before (make sure you go in sequence or it will be out of order)

 

When you have completed all of the information click on the print tab located on the right side of the page.

You can choose if you want it vertical or horizontal.  Then print it J

 

 Sequencing

 

Name __________________________________________________________________

 

Date ________

 

1) The following pictures are out of sequence; please put them in order by numbering 1 for the first to 5 for the final in the space given.   

Receiver Reading ______              Shipping ______

 Mailing ______                            Delivering ____

 Sorting ______

 

True or False: Which of the following are examples of sequences?  Put T for true and F for false in the space provided.

2) _____ The life cycle of a butterfly.

3) _____ Baby, child, and then adult person.

4) _____ Grass, Flowers, and Trees.

5) _____ Beginning, middle, and end of a story.

6) _____ Events in your life.

Read the following story then circle to answer the questions that follow. 

 

Are You My Mother?  - By  P.D. Eastman

A mother bird is sitting on her egg in her nest.  Suddenly the egg jumps, and mother bird realizes that her baby is about to break out of its egg and will be hungry.  Away she flies for food.
     While the mother bird is gone, the baby bird comes out of its
shell.  The first thing he says is, "Where is my mother?"  He starts looking for her but doesn’t see her in the nest.  The baby bird wants to find his mother, but forgets that he can’t fly.  He falls down, way down out the nest.  He starts to walk to find his mother. He doesn’t know what his mother looks like, so he walks right by her.
      He comes upon a kitten, a hen, a dog, and a
cow.  The baby bird asks all of them the same question, "Are you my mother?"  They all reply no.  Before he continues his search, he stops to wonder if he really does have a mother.  He is positive he does, so he goes on.
      Next he comes upon other things, an
old car, a boat, and a plane and asks if any of them could be his mother.  He gets no reply, so on he goes.
      The last thing he meets up with, is a great big excavator.  He is so sure this is his mother.  Finally he has found her!  He runs excitedly up to it, climbs on and says, "Mother Mother, here I am mother!"  The excavator says to the baby bird, "SNORT".  Quickly the baby bird realizes he has made a mistake.  This is definitely not his mother.  The excavator begins to move and the baby bird is in
big trouble now.  He cries out, "I want to go home, I want my mother!"
      The excavator puts the baby bird gently back in his nest and his mother comes home.  She asks him if he knows who she is.  After the baby bird tells his mother of all the adventures he had looking for her, he says, "You are bird, and you are my mother." (
http://www.preschooleducation.com/br82.shtml)

 

7) What comes second in the story?                                          

a) The mother bird comes back to the nest

b) The egg suddenly jumps

c) The mother bird is sitting on the egg

d) The mother bird leaves

 

8) Which does the baby bird come to first?

a) An old car

b) The “SNORT” making excavator

c) A kitten

d) His mother

 

9) Imagine if the story was told as follows: the baby bird told his mother of all the adventures he had that day.  Then the baby bird talked to all the different animals and equipment, and then the baby bird was hatched.  Would that make sense?  Why or why not?  Answer on the rest of the page.

  

 Parent Letter

 

Dear Parent,

 

In our third grade class, we are going to be studying sequences.  We will be looking at how sequences of people in the community help to complete a task.  For example delivering a letter: a person has to write the letter, a mailman has to pick up the letter, an employee has to sort the letter, another mailman has to deliver the letter, and finally the receiver reads the letter.  We will also be using sequencing to examine different cycles of life, building upon what they have learned about cycles of life in earlier grades and connecting that to sequences.  The third lesson in this unit will be using sequences to better reading-comprehension.  Finally the children will be examining sequences in timelines, and they will be using the computer to create their own timeline.  

 

I would like your help tonight by telling your child something about your job and how you depend on others to help you complete your job and how others depend on you to complete their job.  Please help your students fill out the questions below.

 

Your job title? _____________________________________________________

 

Pick one task in which someone is dependent on you to do their job.  What do you do to help them complete their job? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Now please pick one task in which someone else has to do something for you to complete your job.  What do they do? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________   

 

Parent Signature: ______________________________________________________

 

Thank you for helping us with this project. If you have any questions, you can call me at ___-___-____ or email me at ___________  You can also email me about your student’s progress whenever you want information.

 

Sincerely,

 

Parent Letter

 

Dear Parent,

 

Thank you for your response to my last parent activity request.  The information you gave was very helpful to all of my students.  If you will recall from the last letter I sent home, our third grade class is doing a project on sequencing.  This lesson has been very interesting and the children now understand how much sequences affect their lives.

 

Tomorrow we will be ending our unit with timelines.  Every student will be completing a timeline on themselves.  To help the children complete their timeline, please discuss with them important events that took place during their lives.  I have included some guidelines to help you complete this task with your students.

 

When were they born?  (If information is available, tell them the time, date, year) _______________________________________________________________________

 

What was something specific that took place when they were 2 (please tell them the year)? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

What is something specific that took place when they were 4 (please tell them the year)? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Tell them what year they started kindergarten and what location that was in? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

If there were any other specific events in their lives, please tell them (these could be younger siblings being born or moves or anything else).  Please include their age and the year that this took place. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

Parent Signature: ______________________________________________________

 

Thank you for helping us with this project. If you have any questions, you can call me at ___-___-____ or email me at ____________.  You can also email me about your student’s progress whenever you want information.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

7.  Accommodations for Diverse Learners

Accommodations for Diverse Learners

 

There are many things that can be done in a classroom to help students learn.

Among them are:

          Establish rules in the classroom.

          Be consistent in applying the rules to every person all the time.

          Interact with the student by: eye contact, calling their name etc.

          Place student in the front, or near positive peers, or in low distracting areas.

          Reduce external visual & auditory stimuli.

          Repeat & have the student paraphrase the directions.

          Give short directions.

          Use predetermined signals.

          Use multiple modalities for different learning styles.

          Have natural & logical consequences for behavior modification.

          Develop learning contracts with the student.

          Use environmental clues such as prompts, steps, written lists, schedules.

          Demonstrate acceptable ways to communicate displeasure, anger, frustration & pleasure.

There are many more things that can be done to help accommodate learning problems or differences in students. Asking for help from the professionals in the school or other teachers is always a good plan as well. Essentially, being aware of who is in the class and what specifically would help him/her, and then doing that accommodation, is necessary in any successful classroom.

 

8.  Technology

Students will use technology in the fourth lesson when they go into the computer lab and make and print their own timeline. 

 

9.  Parent Involvement

Parents will be involved in the sequencing unit in two ways.  First they will be involved when the students go home and discuss their parent’s jobs.  Secondly they will be involved when the students ask their parents about the events that have take place during the student’s life. 

 

 

 

 

10.  Culminating activity for unit

The culminating activity is the fourth lesson.

11.  Culminating Assessment Plan

The culminating activity is a unit test, which is included in the fourth lesson (fourth lesson included here again. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.  Materials List

Materials

  • Copies of the attached worksheet on community members
  • Colored pencils or some other means of coloring
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Pencil
  • Lined paper
  • Plain white paper divided in three sections
  • Colored paper
  • Book such as Paul Bunyan
  • Plain white paper not divided into sections
  • Computers
  • Copies of the test 

 

13.  Bibliography of Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

 

(2003, August 27). Lean on Me - We Depend on Each Other!. Retrieved May 22, 2007, from EcanEdLink Web site: http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM446&page=teacher

Interactive Timeline. Retrieved May 27, 2007, from Read*Write*Think Web site: http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/timeline/index.html

(J. Matheson, personal communication, May 18, 2007)

Leliaert, L. (2004, June 30). Sequencing: A Strategy to Succeed at Reading Comprehension. Retrieved May 22, 2007, from Read*Write*Thnk Web site: http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view_printer_friendly.asp?id=315

Resources for Teachers.  Retrieved May 31, 2007, from OSPI Website: http/www.k12.wa.us

Wood, L. (1997). Are You My Mother?. Retrieved June 2, 2007, from Preschool Education Web site: http://www.preschooleducation.com/br82.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14.  Unit Plan Reflection

 

Were my objective(s) appropriate for my students?  Were the procedures I used as effective as they might have been?  Did I adequately accommodate learner’s needs?  Were demonstrations relevant to student learning?  Did the teacher provide relevant examples to enhance student learning?  What was done well by the teacher?  Would the teacher do this unit again?